Listening to the River
Listening to the River

"Ultimately, LTTR is about helping everyone in our communities gain a better understanding of watersheds."

Joe VanderMeulen
Principal Investigator

 

 

Listening to the River is an informal science education program that engages teens and adults in the exploration of the characteristics, functions and values of watersheds.

LIAA - Innovative Ideas for Sustainable Communities
Great Lakes Children's MuseumInterlochen Public Radio

National Science FoundationSupported by a National Science Foundation Grant - Informal Science Division

Welcome

Welcome to the Listening to the River (LTTR) project website. LTTR offers a unique opportunity to develop partnerships between youth-, media-, and nature-based community organizations that encourage teens to translate their perspectives about "sense of place" into multimedia stories. Public access to the stories via web-based interactive maps, audio and video broadcasts, and exhibits contributes to community-wide environmental stewardship.
After five years of development, ideas and strategies honed under this National Science Foundation Informal Science Education (ISE) program are ready to be shared - with you! If your interests are in environmental education programming, in promoting young people as nature journalists, or in current trends in media production and broadcast, LTTR activities can add value to your programs.

Go ahead and click around. Discover recommendations, tips, techniques and loads of support materials on everything from partnering on community outdoor events to building an online MediaScape, with ideas for a lot of watershed discovery activities in between.

 

Mediascape Stories

Participants in LTTR programs produce multimedia projects that are displayed on maps we call "Mediascapes".  To view some of these projects, click on a project area on the map below:

Listening to the River Project Locations

Marquette Project Area Grand Traverse Bay Project Area
This page last updated on 6/29/2010.

For more information, contact LIAA: 324 Munson Ave. | Traverse City, MI 49686 | 231-929-3696 | info@liaa.org | www.liaa.org

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0540187.
Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.